SELECT * FROM london_stages WHERE MATCH('(@(authnameclean,perftitleclean,commentcclean,commentpclean) "K"/1) | (@(roleclean,performerclean) "K")') GROUP BY eventid ORDER BY weight() desc, eventdate asc OPTION field_weights=(perftitleclean=100, commentpclean=75, commentcclean=75, roleclean=100, performerclean=100, authnameclean=100), ranker=sph04

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We found 43 matches on Event Comments, 6 matches on Performance Title, 4 matches on Performance Comments, 1 matches on Roles/Actors, and 0 matches on Author.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Rehearsal

Performance Comment: Bayes-Foote; others-Aickin, Whitefield, Parsons, Davis, Fearon, Baddeley, L'Estrange, Lloyd, Edwin, Brett, Jones, Griffith, Pierce, Walters, Francis, Miss Ambrose, K. Palmer, Miss Francis, Miss Platt; With the Reinforcement of Bayes's New Rais'd Troops-.
Related Works
Related Work: Britons Strike Home; or, The Sailors' Rehearsal Author(s): Edward Phillips
Related Work: The Rehearsal Author(s): George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham
Related Work: The Female Wits; or, The Triumvirate of Poets at Rehearsal Author(s): W.M.
Related Work: The Contrast: A Tragi-Comical Rehearsal of Two Modern Plays: Match Upon Match; or, No Match at All, and the Tragedy of Epaminodas Author(s): John Hoadley
Related Work: A Peep Behind the Curtain; or, The New Rehearsal Author(s): David Garrick
Related Work: The Rehearsal; or, Bayes in Petticoats Author(s): Katherine Clive

Afterpiece Title: The Padlock

Performance Comment: As17760708 but Diego-Bannister.
Cast
Role: Diego Actor: Bannister.
Role: Leander Actor: Brett
Role: Mungo Actor: Jackson
Role: Ursula Actor: Mrs Love
Role: Leonora Actor: Mrs Jewell.
Related Works
Related Work: The Padlock Author(s): Isaac BickerstaffeCharles Dibdin

Dance: Tambourine Dance-

Event Comment: [Henderson's 1st appearance as Richard was at Bath, 20 Oct. 1772. Mrs Massey was from the Norwich theatre.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: K

Performance Comment: Richard III. Richard-Henderson (1st appearance in that character [in London]); King Henry-Younger; Catesby-T. Davis; Ratcliff-Egan; Lieutenant-R. Palmer; Lord Mayor-Massey; Buckingham-Aickin; Tressel-Davies; Stanley-Fearon; Norfolk-Griffiths; Tyrrell-Kenny; Oxford-Stevens; Prince Edward-Miss Francis; Duke of York-Master Edwin; Richmond-Palmer; Lady Anne-Mrs Hunter; Duchess of York-Mrs Poussin; Queen Elizabeth-Mrs Massey (1st appearance on this stage).
Cast
Role: Richard Actor: Henderson
Role: King Henry Actor: Younger
Role: Catesby Actor: T. Davis
Role: Ratcliff Actor: Egan
Role: Lieutenant Actor: R. Palmer
Role: Lord Mayor Actor: Massey
Role: Buckingham Actor: Aickin
Role: Tressel Actor: Davies
Role: Stanley Actor: Fearon
Role: Norfolk Actor: Griffiths
Role: Tyrrell Actor: Kenny
Role: Oxford Actor: Stevens
Role: Prince Edward Actor: Miss Francis
Role: Duke of York Actor: Master Edwin
Role: Richmond Actor: Palmer
Role: Lady Anne Actor: Mrs Hunter
Role: Duchess of York Actor: Mrs Poussin
Role: Queen Elizabeth Actor: Mrs Massey

Afterpiece Title: Miss in Her Teens

Performance Comment: Captain Flash-Palmer; Captain Loveit-R. Palmer; Jasper-Egan; Puff-Fearon; Fribble (with a song)-Blissett; Tag-Mrs Gardner; Miss Biddy-Mrs Davies.
Cast
Role: Captain Flash Actor: Palmer
Role: Captain Loveit Actor: R. Palmer
Role: Jasper Actor: Egan
Role: Puff Actor: Fearon
Role: Fribble Actor: Blissett
Role: Tag Actor: Mrs Gardner
Role: Miss Biddy Actor: Mrs Davies.
Related Works
Related Work: Miss in her Teens Author(s): David Garrick
Event Comment: ['The scene of the tent...was judiciously managed with regard to the lighting it withinside the tent only' (London Chronicle, 9 Aug.)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: K

Performance Comment: Richard III. As17770807.
Cast
Role: Richard Actor: Henderson
Role: King Henry Actor: Younger
Role: Catesby Actor: T. Davis
Role: Ratcliff Actor: Egan
Role: Lieutenant Actor: R. Palmer
Role: Lord Mayor Actor: Massey
Role: Buckingham Actor: Aickin
Role: Tressel Actor: Davies
Role: Stanley Actor: Fearon
Role: Norfolk Actor: Griffiths
Role: Tyrrell Actor: Kenny
Role: Oxford Actor: Stevens
Role: Prince Edward Actor: Miss Francis
Role: Duke of York Actor: Master Edwin
Role: Richmond Actor: Palmer
Role: Lady Anne Actor: Mrs Hunter
Role: Duchess of York Actor: Mrs Poussin
Role: Queen Elizabeth Actor: Mrs Massey

Afterpiece Title: The Recruiting Serjeant

Performance Comment: As17770703.
Cast
Role: Serjeant Actor: Bannister
Role: Countryman Actor: Davies
Role: Wife Actor: Mrs Love
Role: Mother Actor: Mrs Hitchcock. These two parts are here transposed
Role: Mother Actor: Mrs Love
Role: Wife Actor: Mrs Hitchcock

Performances

Mainpiece Title: K

Performance Comment: Richard III. As17770807.
Cast
Role: Richard Actor: Henderson
Role: King Henry Actor: Younger
Role: Catesby Actor: T. Davis
Role: Ratcliff Actor: Egan
Role: Lieutenant Actor: R. Palmer
Role: Lord Mayor Actor: Massey
Role: Buckingham Actor: Aickin
Role: Tressel Actor: Davies
Role: Stanley Actor: Fearon
Role: Norfolk Actor: Griffiths
Role: Tyrrell Actor: Kenny
Role: Oxford Actor: Stevens
Role: Prince Edward Actor: Miss Francis
Role: Duke of York Actor: Master Edwin
Role: Richmond Actor: Palmer
Role: Lady Anne Actor: Mrs Hunter
Role: Duchess of York Actor: Mrs Poussin
Role: Queen Elizabeth Actor: Mrs Massey

Afterpiece Title: The Portrait

Performance Comment: As17770724.
Cast
Role: Leander Actor: Bannister
Role: Pantaloon Actor: Edwin
Role: Colombine Actor: Mrs Hitchcock
Role: Isabel Actor: Miss Twist.
Related Works
Related Work: The Portrait Author(s): George Colman, the elderSamuel Arnold
Related Work: Le Portrait Author(s): Saint Foix
Event Comment: Paid Music 19th Inst. #7 11s. 8d.; Properties 19th Inst. 10s. 8d. Receipts: #188 17s. 6d. (184/3/0; 4/14/6)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: K

Performance Comment: Richard III. King Richard-Henderson; King Henry-Clarke; Richmond-Wroughton; Buckingham-Hull; Stanley-Fearon; Tressel-Farren; Prince Edward-Master Farley; Duke of York-Master Simmons; Norfolk-Booth; Lieutenant-Cubitt; Catesby-Davies; Ratcliffe-Thompson; Lord Mayor-Gardner; Oxford-Helme; Lady Anne-Miss Ranoe; Duchess of York-Miss Platt; Queen-Mrs Bates .
Cast
Role: . King Richard Actor: Henderson
Role: King Henry Actor: Clarke
Role: Richmond Actor: Wroughton
Role: Buckingham Actor: Hull
Role: Stanley Actor: Fearon
Role: Tressel Actor: Farren
Role: Prince Edward Actor: Master Farley
Role: Duke of York Actor: Master Simmons
Role: Norfolk Actor: Booth
Role: Lieutenant Actor: Cubitt
Role: Catesby Actor: Davies
Role: Ratcliffe Actor: Thompson
Role: Lord Mayor Actor: Gardner
Role: Oxford Actor: Helme
Role: Lady Anne Actor: Miss Ranoe
Role: Duchess of York Actor: Miss Platt
Role: Queen Actor: Mrs Bates

Afterpiece Title: Rosin a

Performance Comment: Belville-Johnstone; Captain Belville-Brett; Rustic-Davies; Irishman-Swords; William-Mrs Kennedy; Phoebe-Mrs Martyr; Dorcas-Mrs Pitt; Rosina-Mrs Bannister .
Cast
Role: Belville Actor: Johnstone
Role: Captain Belville Actor: Brett
Role: Rustic Actor: Davies
Role: Irishman Actor: Swords
Role: William Actor: Mrs Kennedy
Role: Phoebe Actor: Mrs Martyr
Role: Dorcas Actor: Mrs Pitt
Role: Rosina Actor: Mrs Bannister
Event Comment: Afterpiece: Not acted these 4 years [acted 28 May 1784]. "We see the present rising theatrical generation swinging back with a vengeance to rant and mouthing. The natural and just medium introduced by Garrick seems already forgotten, and speaking no longer deemed a requisite for the stage . . . But last night in Richard Holman was not more violent than the character required him to be" (Public Advertiser, 6 Dec). Receipts: #147 1s. 6d. (143/14/6; 3/7/0)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: K

Performance Comment: Richard III. As17850921, but King Richard-Holman; King Henry (1st time)-Aickin; Lady Anne-Mrs Rivers [i.e. formerly Miss Ranoe] .i.e. formerly Miss Ranoe] .
Cast
Role: King Richard Actor: Holman
Role: King Henry Actor: Aickin
Role: Lady Anne Actor: Mrs Rivers
Role: . King Richard Actor: Henderson
Role: Richmond Actor: Wroughton
Role: Buckingham Actor: Hull
Role: Stanley Actor: Fearon
Role: Tressel Actor: Farren
Role: Prince Edward Actor: Master Farley
Role: Duke of York Actor: Master Simmons
Role: Norfolk Actor: Booth
Role: Lieutenant Actor: Cubitt
Role: Catesby Actor: Davies
Role: Ratcliffe Actor: Thompson
Role: Lord Mayor Actor: Gardner
Role: Oxford Actor: Helme
Role: Duchess of York Actor: Miss Platt
Role: Queen Actor: Mrs Bates

Afterpiece Title: Poor Vulcan

Performance Comment: Vulcan-Quick; Joe-Brett; Bacchus-Palmer; Apollo-Meadows; Serjeant-Darley; Mercury-Doyle; The Squire (1st time)-Johnstone; Grace-Miss Stuart; Maudlin-Mrs Martyr .
Cast
Role: Vulcan Actor: Quick
Role: Joe Actor: Brett
Role: Bacchus Actor: Palmer
Role: Apollo Actor: Meadows
Role: Serjeant Actor: Darley
Role: Mercury Actor: Doyle
Role: The Squire Actor: Johnstone
Role: Grace Actor: Miss Stuart
Role: Maudlin Actor: Mrs Martyr
Related Works
Related Work: Poor Vulcan! Author(s): Charles Dibdin
Event Comment: Afterpiece: A revived Grand Pantomimical Ballet. To conclude with a superb Prospect of the Infernal Regions. [This was included in all subsequent performances; and see 6 Nov.] Books of the Pantomime to be had at the Theatre. With new Scenes, Dresses and Decorations. The Scenes designed and painted by Greenwood. Receipts: #272 14s. (238.18; 32.4; 1.12)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Haunted Tower

Performance Comment: As17900911, but Lady Elinor-Miss Hagley; Cicely-Mrs Bland (late Miss Romanzini).
Cast
Role: Lady Elinor Actor: Miss Hagley
Role: Cicely Actor: Mrs Bland
Role: Lord William Actor: Kelly
Role: Baron of Oakland Actor: Baddeley
Role: Edward Actor: Bannister Jun.
Role: Lewis Actor: Suett
Role: Robert Actor: Dignum
Role: Charles Actor: Sedgwick
Role: Hugo Actor: Moody
Role: De Courcy Actor: Whitfield
Role: Martin Actor: Williames
Role: Servant Actor: Lyons
Role: Hubert Actor: Webb
Role: Adela Actor: Sga Storace
Role: Maud Actor: Mrs Booth.
Related Works
Related Work: The Haunted Tower Author(s): James CobbStephen Storace

Afterpiece Title: Don Juan; or, The Libertine Destroyed

Performance Comment: Don Antonio-Williames; Don Ferdinand-Dignum; Don Juan-Palmer; Don Guzman-Benson; Carlos-Haymes; Perez-Bland; Pedrillo-Banks; Lopez-Lyons; Gomez-Alfred; Vasquez-Fawcett; Host-Chapman; Masaniello-Fairbrother; Scaramouch (with a song)-Dubois; Alguaziles-Burton, Jones, Webb; Boatswain (with a song)-Sedgwick; Sailors-Phillimore, Danby, Maddocks; Donna Anna-Miss Collins; Isabella-Miss Heard; Inis-Miss Palmer; Katharina-Mrs Edwards; Viletta-Mrs Bland; Vocal Parts-Dignum, Sedgwick, Mrs Bland, Mrs Edwards, Miss Hagley; Edition of 1790 (C. Lowndes) adds: Waiter-Fairbrother (i.e. doubled Masaniello); 4th Sailor-Reynoldson.
Cast
Role: Don Antonio Actor: Williames
Role: Don Ferdinand Actor: Dignum
Role: Don Juan Actor: Palmer
Role: Don Guzman Actor: Benson
Role: Carlos Actor: Haymes
Role: Perez Actor: Bland
Role: Pedrillo Actor: Banks
Role: Lopez Actor: Lyons
Role: Gomez Actor: Alfred
Role: Vasquez Actor: Fawcett
Role: Host Actor: Chapman
Role: Masaniello Actor: Fairbrother
Role: Scaramouch Actor: Dubois
Role: Alguaziles Actor: Burton, Jones, Webb
Role: Boatswain Actor: Sedgwick
Role: Sailors Actor: Phillimore, Danby, Maddocks
Role: Donna Anna Actor: Miss Collins
Role: Isabella Actor: Miss Heard
Role: Inis Actor: Miss Palmer
Role: Katharina Actor: Mrs Edwards
Role: Viletta Actor: Mrs Bland
Role: Vocal Parts Actor: Dignum, Sedgwick, Mrs Bland, Mrs Edwards, Miss Hagley
Role: Waiter Actor: Fairbrother
Role: 4th Sailor Actor: Reynoldson.
Related Works
Related Work: The Libertine Destroyed Author(s): Thomas Shadwell
Related Work: Don Juan; or, The Livertine Destroy'd Author(s): Chevalier Clough
Related Work: Le Festin de Pierre; ou, Arlequin fait las Valet de Dom Juan Author(s): Letelier

Dance: In afterpiece: under the Direction of D'Egville, Hamoir, Bourk, Miss Blanchet, Miss DeCamp, Edition of 1790 adds: Fairbrother, Whittow, Kirk, Whitmell, Walker, Bidotti, Nicolini, Mrs Davis, Mrs Brooker, Mrs Haskey, Mrs Brigg, Mrs Barrett, Mrs Harris, Mrs K. Davis, Miss Bourk

Performance Comment: Davis, Miss Bourk.
Related Works
Related Work: The Night Walker; or, The Little Thief Author(s): John FletcherJames Shirley
Related Work: Cleartes Author(s): Cav. Nicolini Grimaldi
Related Work: The Little Thief Author(s): John Fletcher
Related Work: Victorious Love Author(s): William Walker
Related Work: Marry; or Do Worse Author(s): William Walker
Related Work: The Wit of a Woman Author(s): Thomas Walker
Related Work: The Fatal Villainy Author(s): Thomas Walker
Related Work: Matrimony Author(s): Frances Abington
Event Comment: NNeale had Tickets (Cross). Last time of the Company's performing this season. Neale had tickets on this night for which it is customary to pay half price, the whole amount of his tickets in the House came to #22 7s. (Powel). Receipts: #60 (Cross); #33 18s. 6d. (Powel). General Advertiser, 23 June: Yesterday was married by the Rev. Mr Franklin at his Chapel Russel St?, Bloomsbury,--David Garrick Esq. to Mlle Eva Maria Violette. Comments by John Powel in MS Tit for Tat: This was the last night of the season, having play'd 175 nights. Rec'd by forfeits of the Band of Music #32 11d. Rec'd ditto from actors #1 15s. Rec'd of Mr Neale for half share of his tickets #11 3s. 6d. So that they received as appears by their own books in the two seasons that Mr G k has been concern'd as manager, the sum of #40,906 2s. 7d. having play'd in the whole time 346 nights. But as Mr Garrick's Benefit and Mrs Cibber's charges were included in the account as a blind to the Principle Treasurer, I must therefore, among some few other things, subtract them from the total amount, and then it will stand as follows: @The first season:@Cash return'd by licencer #2 2s.@G k's Benefit, whole amount of house #193 16s.@Mrs Cibber's charges at her Bt. #60@Mr Berry #1 10s.@Mrs Pritchard for a ticket as agreed #10 10s.@The last season G k receiv'd as author of Lethe, for 6th night #56 8s. 6d.@Mr Warner #5 14s.@G k's benefit as before #187@Mrs Cibber's charges #60@Mrs Pritchard's #10@Total #587 16s. 6d.@ The sum subtracted, it wil remain #40,318 6s. 1d., which is at the rate of #116 10s. 6d. for each night, one night with another, Benefit nights and all Disadvantages included. As I have no given an exact account of the Receipts of Cash, I must also endeavor to give an account of the nightly charge, that the reader may be able to judge of the Profits. But it must be first consider'd, that all nights will not amount to the same, as for example the play of Macbeth requires more incidents, than a common play, such as wine, fruit made use of in the Banqueting Scene, also spirits of wine for the Cauldron in the scene of the Witches, Rosin for lightening, &c. Whereas in another play, such as the Orphan perhaps there are few or no incidents, and consequently the charges must be less, so that it is impossible to be quite exact without giving the particulars of each night's play throughout the two seasons which would not only tire the reader's patience, but swell this pamphlet to a greater bulk than the nature of the thing requires; besides as all the Account Books are in their own custody, there can be no such thing as making an abstract. But as my own memorandums will let me into the most principle things, it is an easy matter to make an allowance for others of less consequence, which I shall take care as much as I can to do rather in their favor than against them. In the first place I shall begin with their Rents and Taxes as they stood last season: @A Calculation of the Nightly Expence of Drury Lane Playhouse:@Renter's Shares in the House, being in number Thirty-Six at #23 6s. 8d. each share for the season amounts in all to #840, and supposing they play but 170 nights (tho' they play'd 175 last season which is allowing them as much advantage as I possibly can) then will it amount to per night #4 18s. 9d.@Land Tax for the year #88, which calculated at the rate of 170 nights as above, is per night 10s. 4d.@Ground Rent, and for the rent of a Wardrobe call'd the Sparrow's Nest, for the year #80, which is per night 9s. 4d.@Poor's rate for the year #33 6s. 8d., which is per night 3s. 11d.@Scavanger for the House, and another place call'd the King's Passage, for the year #7 9s. 4d., which is 10 1!2d.@Rent for a Place call'd the King's Passage for the year #31 10s., which is per night 3s. 8 1!4d.@Watch Rate for the Playhouse and a House in Russel St, call'd the King's Passage #7, which is per night 9 3!4d.@Window lights for the Playhouse and the King's Passage, #6 per year, which is per night 8 1!4d.@Water for the year, #2, which is per night 2 3!3d.@Rent of a room call'd the Scene Room for the year #60, which is per night 7s. 1!2d.@Fruit money to be divided among the renters, as by their Lease #40, which is per night 4s. 8 1!4d.@(N.B.: It has not been the custom for some years past to pay this money to the Renters, but as they are entitled to receive it, I think proper to make it one of the charges.)@A Perquisite payable out of the P t [Patent?] for the year #815, which is per night #1 1 7s. 1!2d.@The Total amount of their Rent and Taxes is per night #8 17s. 6d.@ Thus far I have given an account of their rents] and Taxes and before I proceed any farther I believe it will be necessary to acquaint the reader, that the Renter's Lease will expire in the year 1753, and then the whole affair will come into the hands of Messrs G k and L y, for the term of near 21 years at an annual Rent of #210. This is a purchase made not long ago, for which they gave #3000. But the Annual rent of #210 commences before the Renters time is out, occasioned by an addition of several dwelling Houses in the Playhouse Passages which they had thrown into their agreement, and for some of which they now receive Rent. The next principal charge is the Nightly Salaries of the people belonging to the House, such as actors, dancers, musicians, office keepers, doorkeepers, dressers, and sweepers. The customary way of paying these people is once a week; on a Saturday Morning their names being all enter'd alphabetically upon a list (which is call'd the Pay List). This List is always made out according to the number of nights that the House has played in the week, but I must set it down at 6 which is a full week's pay. This is also a fluctuating affair, as well as the incidents, their generally being a necessity of either adding or striking off some names before the season is out, which consequently either makes an increase or decrease in the charges, but as I am oblig'd to be as particular as possible, and to bring it to a point, I will fix upon salaries of the latest date. @Sat. Feb. 25, 1748-49. The salaries amounted to per week #296 9s. 6d., and on Sat. 15 Apr. 1749, the salaries were per week #294 6d. But as I chuse to make the thing rather more than less, I will enter it according to the former list, which is per night #49 8s. 8d.@N.B. Mr Lacy has #2 15s. 6d. per night upon this list for management, but I cannot comprehend that this is any part of the charge because he has a moity, or equal half-share of the Profits, as being a partner; and consequently ought not to be paid for inspecting into his own affairs. I shall therefore subtract this from the Nightly expence at the end.@The next charge to be consider'd is that of the Tallow Chandler, which generally amounts to per week about #17, but this is not always certain, it varying sometimes either a trifle over or under. This person makes an allowance of 8 per cent Discount upon account of his receiving ready money for his goods, which deducted from the #17 makes it per night #2 12s. 1d.@The Printer's Bill generally amounts to between #7 and #8 per week, but as I rather chuse to be over than under the mark, I will set it down at #8, which is per night #1 6s. 8d.@Advertisements in the General Advertiser, there has been nothing charg'd for these two years and upwards, which I believe is occasion'd by the Managers having a share in that paper, that perhaps may bring as much as their advertisements come to.@I shall find the greatest difficulty of any yet in making an Allowance for the nightly use of their cloaths, Scenes, &c, there being a vast number of rich cloaths bought into their wardrobe within these two years, and large sums paid to the Taylor, Mercer and other Tradesmen, on account of the same, but then the Stock remains, and will serve for a considerable time with some little addition, and it is well known the wardrobe was never so rich before, as at this juncture, a great many of the cloaths having been bought ready-made at dery great bargains, and when they are no longer fit to appear upon the stage, the Lace will burn to a considerable part of their money again; And as it is impossible to be quite exact, I must submit to the reader whether #3 3s. a Night only for the use of their cloaths, Scenes and other things that appertain to the dress, is not sufficient, for according to the calculation of playing 170 nights in the season it will amount to #535 10s., only for the use, which in my opinion is enough, and if they can contradict it let them make it appear #3 3s.@Mr Fleetwood (who was the late manager) when he made an assignment of the Playhouse to Mr Lacy in trust for the Bankers (Gr n, and Am r, late of the Strand) and himself to care to keep a Reserve of #500 a year during the Time then to come on the P t [patent?], a part of which has been paid annually to a Gentleman appointed to receive the same by Mr Fleetwood. But when Mr G k came in as manager, it was agreed by the consent of that Gentleman, that it should be paid at the rate of #300 a year, and so to take a longer time for the payment of the whole. This annuity had it stood at the rate of #500 a year as was first design'd would have expir'd with the P t, which is several months before the Renter's time is out, but this affair ought to be look'd upon rather as a Debt than part of the nightly charge of the Playhouse. However, as it always stood in that Rank in their books, I shall make the same allowance here and leave the reader to judge of it as he thinks proper, which is per night according to the former calculation #1 15s. 3d.@The Lamp Lighter's bill for lighting the lamps will amount to about 7 shillings sixpence a night, but as there is an occasion sometimes for Tin Wares and reparations, I shall set it down at Per night 10s.@Coals made use of are generally about 40 Chaldrons for the season, which bought in the summer time, we must suppose not be to above 34s. a chaldron, amounting in the whole to #68, which is per night 8s.@Properties, or Incidents, are sometimes more, sometimes less, as I have before observed, and are according to the play. They are under the Denomination of Fruit, Wines, Sweetmeats, Sticks, Stage Money, &c, but to take one night with another throughout the season they don't amount to quite 5s.@Bill Stickers are those men that stick the Large Bills about the Town, being Six in number, and have 18 pence per night each. They are not enter'd on the pay List among other servants, on account of their sticking Bills sometimes when the House does not play, which makes a difference, and supposing them to be in full pay, which is not always the case, then it would amount to per night 9s.@Two men that deliver Handbills, at 1 shilling a night each per night 2s.@Four constant supernumerary scene-men to assist the scene-men belonging to the House, and a Candle-man that sees all tne candles put out after the play is over, at 1 shilling each, which is per night 5s.@There are sometimes extraordinary Supernumerary scene-men, made use of in plays, to help the traps, &c, such as Richard III, Macbeth, The Tempest, &c, which have a shilling each, but one night with another it will not amount to above 3s.@Kettle Drums and French Horns are not included among the Band of Music, and as there are but two French Horns, and one pair of Kettle Drums made use of, which are only in some particular things, at 5 shillings a night, I cannot think they will amount to throughout the season more than per night 7s. 6d.@Chorus singers, which are people that stand behind the scenes, whose additional voices are sometimes necessary in grand pieces of vocal music, and are made use of in the Tempest, Comus, Macbeth, &c., and seldom in number so many as 6, at 5 shillings each,--but if I make allowance for two each night throughout the season, I am very confident it is more than sufficient, which supposition is per night 10s.@The Prompter is allowed for Paper, Pens, Ink and Wafers per night 3d.@The Carpenters, being sometimes employed in doing work in the House, save 2s. 6d. a day each, and as this is also a fluctuating affair, I shall put them down throughout the season at per night 5s.@The Glover's bill amounts one night with another to about 6s.@The Stationer's Bill, perhaps about #15 in the season, every Boxkeeper, &c being oblig'd to find his own Paper, which is per night 1s. 9d.@The Feather-man, Shoe-maker, Sword-Cutler, Hatter, Taylor, Scene Painter, Lace-man, Mercer, &c, I have already made an allowance for,--the #3 3s. per night for the use of the Cloaths, Scenes, &c. ....@The Brick-layer and Iron-monger are casual tradesmen, and as accidents so frequently happen, I think it necessary to put them down at per night 7s. 6d.@The Turner's Bill perhaps may amount in the season to about #6 which is per night 8d.@The person that has the care of the Candles brings in a bill for small wax candles, &c, and one night with another about 1s. 6d.@The House-keeper sometimes brings in a bill for little things to the amount of about per night 1s.@The Prompter for writing parts, one night witn another 8d.@I have thus endeavored to give the most minute Part of the charges that belongs to the House, but as most of these affairs depends upon accident and for fear of any omission (At the beginning of the first season their salaries were a few weeks at #54 per night, but as this was but of a short duration it cannot make any great difference) and lest they say I fix them to certain sums which have alter'd to their disadvantage, I will as a guard against such a supposition allow them per night #3@#74 6s. 8d.@[Subtracting Mr Lacy's #2 15s. 6d.] then according to the nearest calculation I can make the whole nightly charge is #71 11s. 2d.@ The next thing to be consider'd (supposing this charge to be right) is their Profits, which will appear by multiplying the sum of #71 11s. 2d. by 346 (the number of nights they play'd in the two seasons) and the total sum will be #24,759 10s. 10d., which subtracted from #40,318 6s. 1d., the remainder will be #15,558 15s. 2d., the profits, according to the best calculations I can make arising from the two last seasons. But I think it incumbent on me to inform the reader that this money was not all at the Managers' disposal, because there was a mortgage upon the Playhouse, &c to one Mr Clutterbuck?, a tradesman in the Strand, who was Mortgagee in trust for Mr G k himself and others, and the Mortgagee was entitled to take up #1000 a year and interest at 5 per cent. This security was made at Mr G k's first commencing manager in order to purchase the Bankers' two shares in the old P t, &c. which was sold for #3,500, also to discharge an old mortgage made by Mr Fleetwood, and other debts due from the playhouse. Thus have I made appear to the Town the receipts and charges as near as possibly can, and hope not to the disadvantage of the Managers. But perhaps they will say that they have expended more money than I have already given an account of, which I must readily submit to, but then it has been upon different affairs than the nightly charge of the House; as for example the first season they, as will appear by their own Books, #15,179 12s. 3d.; the second season #13,663 3s. 3d., so at this rate the profits do not amount to above #10,475 10s. 8d., which is noways right, for as I have already observed, they bought large quantities of ready-made rich cloaths, merely because they were great bargains. These cloaths they now have by them, and doubtless are as good as money, and which I make an allowance for at #3 3s. a night. They also made alterations in the House, by enlarging the first Gallery, and adding more seats, which are placed so neighborly together, that they keep people pure warm in a cole [sic] winter's night, especially at the upper end. The transformation of that Part adjoining to the Box-Lobby into a standing place for the Quality, that they may pay before they go in, is another charming contrivance, and many other alterations much to advantage, but these conveniences being once finish't become Perpetual, and are no longer chargeable. Besides they lent out of the said sums money to several actors for some of which they have bonds that bear 5 per cent interest, and these are the things that were the occasion of the Extraordinary Advancement, which perhaps they under a pretence may call part of the Nightly charges, but as I have made the thing as clear as well can be, I shall submit to the reader's judgment. I thought it necessary to set down each night's farce with the play as near as I could throughout the two seasons, and I believe upon strict examination the reader will find that the whole number consists of about 25 good old Stagers, one of them having mounted upwards of that times. But however dis[agreea]ble these antient attendants may prove to an Audience, yet they are absolutely necessary on account of keeping up the [starf--l P[rice]s, which could not decently be done without them as Mr Rich has Pantomime entertainments. [starWhilst their rent, Taxes, &c are so very high, it is my firm opinion, they cannot afford to take under full prices, and therefore I would not have any one imagine to the Contrary. And the reason of publishing this account is no more than to do my self common justice and to shew how well they could afford to make me amends for my past Labours. Tho in my opinion Mr G-k is such a rarity, that he needs no embellishment, and I hope I shan't be thought too lavish in his Praise when I say that his great condesention in playing oftener since he has been a manager (almost in spite of his sickness) than he did when he was under management, is such an obligation conferr'd on the town, that it is questionable whether the salary he now receives as an Actor is equivalent. But lest it should not be generally known what it is (as such things do sometimes slip the ears of the People) I think it proper to inform the Reader, and having first ask'd Mr Garrick the manager's pardon, I shall begin with Mr Garrick the Actor, whose salary for the season is #525 certain, and as most players have a benefit once a year, so has he, but only this difference, that they pay for theirs (Mrs Cibber excepted) and he does not. Nor need he give himself any trouble to make an interest at the time; for it is only playing Richard, or Lear, and the job is done without putting his name up in large characters at the top of the Playbill, for every inquisitive person to gape at. What these Benefits have brought him in is easily seen by looking backwards. This added to the salary makes upwards of #700 a year, and so much for Mr G-k the actor. As to Mr Garrick the Manager, he only takes up #500 a year out of the profits under the denomination of Management, which does but just put him upon a footing with his brother manager, who takes up the same, and if I may presume to put the Manager and Actor together, it will appear that Mr Garrick's income from the Playhouse is upwards of #1200 a year exclusive of a Mortgage of #4000 upon the Playhouse, Patent, Cloaths, Scenes, &c., which brings him in #200 per year, at the rate of 5 per cent interest. These things put together and added to his half share of Profits, makes it a comfortable living enough, and I heartily wish every brave fellow that ventured his life and limbs for his Country's service could meet with the same success. I make no doubt but it will create some wonder that I have laid these things before the Town, without saying for why. But I must assure the reader that after weighing every circumstance well within my own breast, I think I have sufficient reason, and would relate each particular reason, but that I have given to understand Facts may be Libels--that all advantages will be taken--that I must have a care what I do, and that Power may get the better of Truth. I must confess I think it very hard that if a man is hurt he must not only suffer the injury, but be also hindered from telling his grievance. However, as I have often groan'd in private, I will run the risk of venturing one groan in public, but will be as concise as possible, for fear my antagonists may be too impatient to stay till my tale is told. Let it suffice them that I was Deputy Treasurer of D-y L-ne Playhouse upwards of four years, and resigened my office the beginning of this season. Several messages were sent to me to return again, and I had my place kept for me several weeks, which plainly shows I have been guilty of no misdemeanor, but have been rather look'd upon as a valuable sl-ve than other ways, and could I have been content with much more labor and little pay I don't doubt but I might have been suffer'd to trudge on and carry my Burthen to the end of my days. But having forgot my station, and that I had no right to make terms for myself, was so impudent as to imagine I had some Gratitude due me for past services, and that as I had weather'd a most terrible Storm, I had some right to share in the calm, but alas! I was mistaken. Property was not intended for me, I was only design'd to share in Adversity and help others to cut their passage to happiness. I believe it is pretty well known that near two years before Mr G-k came in as manager, the Playhouse was involved [in] many difficulties, much money being due to tradesmen, Actors, &c occasioned by his not playing