SELECT * FROM london_stages WHERE MATCH('(@(authnameclean,perftitleclean,commentcclean,commentpclean) "Mlle Anne Auretti"/1) | (@(roleclean,performerclean) "Mlle Anne Auretti")') GROUP BY eventid ORDER BY weight() desc, eventdate asc OPTION field_weights=(perftitleclean=100, commentpclean=75, commentcclean=75, roleclean=100, performerclean=100, authnameclean=100), ranker=sph04

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We found 1813 matches on Performance Title, 1009 matches on Performance Comments, 193 matches on Event Comments, 1 matches on Author, and 0 matches on Roles/Actors.
Event Comment: Benefit Mlle Anne Roland. By Command of Her Royal Highness the Princess Amelia. [Tickets at Mrs Anne Roland's, Golden Ball and Dove, Great Newport Street.]

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Volpone

Cast
Role: Volpone Actor: Quin
Role: Voltore Actor: Milward
Role: Corvino Actor: Mills
Role: Mosca Actor: W. Mills
Role: Sir Politick Actor: Griffin
Role: Lady Wou'dbe Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Caelia Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Corbaccio Actor: Johnson

Afterpiece Title: The Devil to Pay

Cast
Role: Lady Loverule Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Jobson Actor: Harper
Role: Nell Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Sir John Actor: Salway

Music: Select Pieces

Dance: In I: Venetian Gondolier by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c. II: Les Rigadoons a la Provencale originale by Roland, Father of Mlle Roland and Mlle Anne Roland. In In: Biscaien (new) by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c. IV: German Peasant by Roland. V: By Denoyer's Prentice

Performance Comment: II: Les Rigadoons a la Provencale originale by Roland, Father of Mlle Roland and Mlle Anne Roland. In In: Biscaien (new) by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c. IV: German Peasant by Roland. V: By Denoyer's Prentice .
Event Comment: Benefit for Mlle Anne Auretti. Five rows of the Pit will be laid into the boxes, &c. [as on 7 March]. Tickets to be had at Mlle Auretti's at the second House on the left hand, the corner of Panton St., Leicester Fields, and of Hobson at the stage door. Receipts: #180 (Cross); house charges, #63 (Powel)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Provok'd Wife

Cast
Role: Taylor Actor: .
Role: Belinda Actor: Mrs Willoughby
Role: Sir John Brute Actor: Garrick
Role: Constant Actor: Havard
Role: Heartfree Actor: Mills
Role: Bully Actor: Beard
Role: Rake Actor: Blakes
Role: Razor Actor: Yates
Role: Lady Fanciful Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Lady Brute Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Mademoiselle Actor: Mrs Green
Role: Justice Actor: Winstone
Role: Constable Actor: Ray
Role: Watchman Actor: Vaughan.

Afterpiece Title: The Lying Valet

Cast
Role: add Gayless Actor: Blakes
Role: Melissa Actor: Mrs Bennet
Role: Kitty Pry Actor: Mrs Green.
Role: Sharp Actor: Yates.

Dance: I: L'Entree de Flore, as17481027; II: Scotch Dance, as17490118; III: A Harlequin Dance-Matthews, Anne Auretti; V: Louvre and Minuet-Cooke, Anne Auretti

Event Comment: Benefit Anne Auretti. By Command of Their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales. Tickets to be had of Anne Auretti at Mr Chisholm's, the Golden Head in Great Newport St., near Long Acre

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Spanish Fryar

Cast
Role: Fryar Actor: Quin
Role: Torrismond Actor: Hale
Role: Gomez Actor: Hippisley
Role: Queen Actor: Mrs Horton
Role: Elvira Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Lorenzo Actor: Ryan
Role: Bertran Actor: Cashell
Role: Raymond Actor: Rosco
Role: Alphonso Actor: Ridout
Role: Pedro Actor: Gibson
Role: Teresa Actor: Mrs Hale.

Dance: I: Scotch Dance-Delamain, Anne Auretti; II: Tambourine-Anne Auretti; III: Characters of Dancing, as17421025; IV: Un Pas de Deux-Anne and Janneton Auretti; V: L'Aimable Vainqueur, Minuet-Picq, Anne Auretti

Event Comment: Benefit for Anne Auretti. Mainpiece: By Command of their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales. Seven rows of Pit will be rail'd into the Boxes. Stage to be form'd into front and side Boxes. Receipts: #270 (Cross); house charges, #50 (Powel)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Alchymist

Cast
Role: only Drugger Actor: Garrick
Role: Subtle Actor: Mills
Role: Face Actor: Macklin
Role: Doll Actor: Mrs Macklin listed.
Role: Drugger Actor: Garrick
Role: Sir Epicure Actor: Berry
Role: Kastril Actor: Yates
Role: Ananias Actor: Neale
Role: Lovewit Actor: Arthur
Role: Tribulation Actor: Taswell
Role: Surly Actor: Blakes
Role: Dapper Actor: Leigh
Role: Dame Pliant Actor: Mrs Horsington
Role: Doll Common Actor: Mrs Macklin.

Afterpiece Title: The Devil to Pay

Cast
Role: Nell Actor: Mrs Clive.

Dance: I: Le Charactere de la Dance-Anne Auretti; III: The Savage Dance-Cooke, Matthews, Anne Auretti; IV: Dutch Dance, as17471128; V: Hymen's Temple-Cooke, Janeton Auretti; End of Farce: a Minuet, Louvre-Cooke, Anne Auretti

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Alchymist

Cast
Role: Dol Common Actor: Mrs Charke
Role: Subtle Actor: W. Mills
Role: Face Actor: Mills
Role: Ananias Actor: Johnson
Role: Tribulation Actor: Griffin
Role: Kastril Actor: Miller
Role: Dapper Actor: Leigh
Role: Surly Actor: Oates
Role: Lovewit Actor: Shepard
Role: Doll Common Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Dame Pliant Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Drugger Actor: Cibber
Role: Sir Epicure Actor: Harper
Role: Neighbours Actor: Winstone, Wright, Turbutt, Raftor

Afterpiece Title: Harlequin Restor'd

Music: Select Pieces

Dance: II: By Mlle Anne Roland, lately arrived from Paris, the first time of her performance in England. IV: Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, &c

Performance Comment: IV: Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Love Makes A Man

Cast
Role: Carlos Actor: Milward
Role: Clodio Actor: Cibber
Role: Antonio Actor: Shepard
Role: Charino Actor: Griffin
Role: Manuel Actor: Turbutt
Role: Governor Actor: Winstone
Role: Duart Actor: Berry
Role: Sancho Actor: Oates
Role: Monsieur Actor: Sal way
Role: Jaques Actor: Jones
Role: Angelina Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Elvira Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Louisa Actor: Mrs Charke
Role: Honoria Actor: Miss Mann
Role: Cholerick Actor: Miller

Afterpiece Title: The Devil to Pay

Cast
Role: Lady Loverule Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Jobson Actor: Harper
Role: Nell Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Sir John Actor: Salway

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland. II: Grand Serious Ballet by Denoyer and others. III: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, and others. IV: Comic Dance by Le Brun and Mrs Anderson. V: Le Badinage de Provence, as17351117

Performance Comment: II: Grand Serious Ballet by Denoyer and others. III: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, and others. IV: Comic Dance by Le Brun and Mrs Anderson. V: Le Badinage de Provence, as17351117.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Silent Woman

Cast
Role: Morose Actor: Johnson
Role: Sir John Actor: Cibber
Role: Sir Amorous Actor: DL Miller
Role: Truewit Actor: W. Mills
Role: Clerimont Actor: Mills
Role: Dauphine Actor: Milward
Role: Otter Actor: Shepard
Role: Cutbeard Actor: Oates
Role: Epicoene Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Lady Haughty Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Mrs Otter Actor: Mrs Charke
Role: Mrs Centaure Actor: Mrs Grace
Role: Dol Mavis Actor: Miss Mann

Dance: II: By Mlle Anne Roland. IV: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, &c

Performance Comment: IV: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland, Mlle Anne Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Man Of Taste

Cast
Role: Dorothea Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Man of Taste Actor: Cibber
Role: Sir Positive Actor: Griffin
Role: Freelove Actor: Mills
Role: Sir Humphrey Actor: Harper
Role: Reynard Actor: Miller
Role: Valentine Actor: Milward
Role: Harcourt Actor: W. Mills
Role: Horatio Actor: Raftor
Role: Lewis Actor: Cross
Role: Diligence Actor: Turbutt
Role: Almanzor Actor: Master Arne
Role: Lady Henpeck Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Lisetta Actor: Miss Mann
Role: Dorinda Actor: Mrs Thurmond
Role: Maria Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Angelica Actor: Miss Holliday

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland. III: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland and Mlle Anne Roland

Performance Comment: III: Grand Ballet by Mlle Roland and Mlle Anne Roland .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Love's Last Shift

Cast
Role: Loveless Actor: Ryan
Role: Sir William Actor: Hippisley
Role: Sir Novelty Actor: Woodward
Role: Snap Actor: Chapman
Role: Elder Worthy Actor: Bridgwater
Role: Young Worthy Actor: Hale
Role: Sly Actor: Marten
Role: Hillaria Actor: Mrs Stevens
Role: Narcissa Actor: Mrs Horton
Role: Flareit Actor: Mrs Kilby
Role: Amanda's Woman Actor: Mrs Hale
Role: Amanda Actor: Mrs Cibber.

Dance: I: Dutch Skipper, as17421025; II: Characters of Dancing, as17421025; III: Grand Ballet, as17421108; IV: Grand Comic Ballet, as17430407 V: (By particular Desire) a Louvre, Minuet-Lally, Mlle Anne Auretti

Event Comment: Benefit for Mlle Mozon. Tickets, iox. 6d. each, to be had of Mlle Mozon, No. 234, Piccadilly

Performances

Mainpiece Title: La Scuola De Gelosi

Dance: End of Act I L'Amour Jardinier, as17860406, but added: With an additional Pas Seul by Mlle Mozon; End of Opera an entirely new Ballet, composed by D'Egville, La Fife Marine, in which La Provencale by Mlle Mozon; also a Pas de Trois to the favourite tune of Bon Andre taken from the French Comic Opera L'Epreuve Villageoise, the music by Gretry, performed by Vestris, Duquesney Jun., Mlle Baccelli; and to conclude with the Pas de SLuatre, so much admired in Paris, in the Opera called Pamrge, and got up here under the direction of Vestris, and performed by Vestris, Mlle Baccelli, Fabiani, Mlle Mozon. [In a review Morning Herald, 1 May, adds: Sequedilla by Miss De Camp and Master D'Egville.]

Performance Comment: , Mlle Baccelli; and to conclude with the Pas de SLuatre, so much admired in Paris, in the Opera called Pamrge, and got up here under the direction of Vestris, and performed by Vestris, Mlle Baccelli, Fabiani, Mlle Mozon. [In a review Morning Herald, 1 May, adds: Sequedilla by Miss De Camp and Master D'Egville.] hathi.
Cast
Role: : Acis Actor: Vestris
Role: Thetis Actor: Mlle Mozon.
Event Comment: Benefit Delamaine and Janneton Auretti

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Cato

Cast
Role: Cato Actor: Quin
Role: Portius Actor: Ryan
Role: Lucius Actor: Rosco
Role: Sempronius Actor: Cashell
Role: Juba Actor: Hale
Role: Syphax Actor: Gibson
Role: Marcus Actor: Anderson
Role: Decius Actor: Bridgwater
Role: Lucia Actor: Mrs Stevens
Role: Marcia Actor: Mrs Horton.

Afterpiece Title: The Virgin Unmask'd

Dance: I: Italian Dance-Delamaine, Mlle Auguste; II: a Harlequin-Anne Auretti; III: Louvre-Delamaine; IV: Un Pas de Deux, as17430406 V: a Minuet-Delamaine, Janneton Auretti

Event Comment: NNeale had Tickets (Cross). Last time of the Company's performing this season. Neale had tickets on this night for which it is customary to pay half price, the whole amount of his tickets in the House came to #22 7s. (Powel). Receipts: #60 (Cross); #33 18s. 6d. (Powel). General Advertiser, 23 June: Yesterday was married by the Rev. Mr Franklin at his Chapel Russel St?, Bloomsbury,--David Garrick Esq. to Mlle Eva Maria Violette. Comments by John Powel in MS Tit for Tat: This was the last night of the season, having play'd 175 nights. Rec'd by forfeits of the Band of Music #32 11d. Rec'd ditto from actors #1 15s. Rec'd of Mr Neale for half share of his tickets #11 3s. 6d. So that they received as appears by their own books in the two seasons that Mr G k has been concern'd as manager, the sum of #40,906 2s. 7d. having play'd in the whole time 346 nights. But as Mr Garrick's Benefit and Mrs Cibber's charges were included in the account as a blind to the Principle Treasurer, I must therefore, among some few other things, subtract them from the total amount, and then it will stand as follows: @The first season:@Cash return'd by licencer #2 2s.@G k's Benefit, whole amount of house #193 16s.@Mrs Cibber's charges at her Bt. #60@Mr Berry #1 10s.@Mrs Pritchard for a ticket as agreed #10 10s.@The last season G k receiv'd as author of Lethe, for 6th night #56 8s. 6d.@Mr Warner #5 14s.@G k's benefit as before #187@Mrs Cibber's charges #60@Mrs Pritchard's #10@Total #587 16s. 6d.@ The sum subtracted, it wil remain #40,318 6s. 1d., which is at the rate of #116 10s. 6d. for each night, one night with another, Benefit nights and all Disadvantages included. As I have no given an exact account of the Receipts of Cash, I must also endeavor to give an account of the nightly charge, that the reader may be able to judge of the Profits. But it must be first consider'd, that all nights will not amount to the same, as for example the play of Macbeth requires more incidents, than a common play, such as wine, fruit made use of in the Banqueting Scene, also spirits of wine for the Cauldron in the scene of the Witches, Rosin for lightening, &c. Whereas in another play, such as the Orphan perhaps there are few or no incidents, and consequently the charges must be less, so that it is impossible to be quite exact without giving the particulars of each night's play throughout the two seasons which would not only tire the reader's patience, but swell this pamphlet to a greater bulk than the nature of the thing requires; besides as all the Account Books are in their own custody, there can be no such thing as making an abstract. But as my own memorandums will let me into the most principle things, it is an easy matter to make an allowance for others of less consequence, which I shall take care as much as I can to do rather in their favor than against them. In the first place I shall begin with their Rents and Taxes as they stood last season: @A Calculation of the Nightly Expence of Drury Lane Playhouse:@Renter's Shares in the House, being in number Thirty-Six at #23 6s. 8d. each share for the season amounts in all to #840, and supposing they play but 170 nights (tho' they play'd 175 last season which is allowing them as much advantage as I possibly can) then will it amount to per night #4 18s. 9d.@Land Tax for the year #88, which calculated at the rate of 170 nights as above, is per night 10s. 4d.@Ground Rent, and for the rent of a Wardrobe call'd the Sparrow's Nest, for the year #80, which is per night 9s. 4d.@Poor's rate for the year #33 6s. 8d., which is per night 3s. 11d.@Scavanger for the House, and another place call'd the King's Passage, for the year #7 9s. 4d., which is 10 1!2d.@Rent for a Place call'd the King's Passage for the year #31 10s., which is per night 3s. 8 1!4d.@Watch Rate for the Playhouse and a House in Russel St, call'd the King's Passage #7, which is per night 9 3!4d.@Window lights for the Playhouse and the King's Passage, #6 per year, which is per night 8 1!4d.@Water for the year, #2, which is per night 2 3!3d.@Rent of a room call'd the Scene Room for the year #60, which is per night 7s. 1!2d.@Fruit money to be divided among the renters, as by their Lease #40, which is per night 4s. 8 1!4d.@(N.B.: It has not been the custom for some years past to pay this money to the Renters, but as they are entitled to receive it, I think proper to make it one of the charges.)@A Perquisite payable out of the P t [Patent?] for the year #815, which is per night #1 1 7s. 1!2d.@The Total amount of their Rent and Taxes is per night #8 17s. 6d.@ Thus far I have given an account of their rents] and Taxes and before I proceed any farther I believe it will be necessary to acquaint the reader, that the Renter's Lease will expire in the year 1753, and then the whole affair will come into the hands of Messrs G k and L y, for the term of near 21 years at an annual Rent of #210. This is a purchase made not long ago, for which they gave #3000. But the Annual rent of #210 commences before the Renters time is out, occasioned by an addition of several dwelling Houses in the Playhouse Passages which they had thrown into their agreement, and for some of which they now receive Rent. The next principal charge is the Nightly Salaries of the people belonging to the House, such as actors, dancers, musicians, office keepers, doorkeepers, dressers, and sweepers. The customary way of paying these people is once a week; on a Saturday Morning their names being all enter'd alphabetically upon a list (which is call'd the Pay List). This List is always made out according to the number of nights that the House has played in the week, but I must set it down at 6 which is a full week's pay. This is also a fluctuating affair, as well as the incidents, their generally being a necessity of either adding or striking off some names before the season is out, which consequently either makes an increase or decrease in the charges, but as I am oblig'd to be as particular as possible, and to bring it to a point, I will fix upon salaries of the latest date. @Sat. Feb. 25, 1748-49. The salaries amounted to per week #296 9s. 6d., and on Sat. 15 Apr. 1749, the salaries were per week #294 6d. But as I chuse to make the thing rather more than less, I will enter it according to the former list, which is per night #49 8s. 8d.@N.B. Mr Lacy has #2 15s. 6d. per night upon this list for management, but I cannot comprehend that this is any part of the charge because he has a moity, or equal half-share of the Profits, as being a partner; and consequently ought not to be paid for inspecting into his own affairs. I shall therefore subtract this from the Nightly expence at the end.@The next charge to be consider'd is that of the Tallow Chandler, which generally amounts to per week about #17, but this is not always certain, it varying sometimes either a trifle over or under. This person makes an allowance of 8 per cent Discount upon account of his receiving ready money for his goods, which deducted from the #17 makes it per night #2 12s. 1d.@The Printer's Bill generally amounts to between #7 and #8 per week, but as I rather chuse to be over than under the mark, I will set it down at #8, which is per night #1 6s. 8d.@Advertisements in the General Advertiser, there has been nothing charg'd for these two years and upwards, which I believe is occasion'd by the Managers having a share in that paper, that perhaps may bring as much as their advertisements come to.@I shall find the greatest difficulty of any yet in making an Allowance for the nightly use of their cloaths, Scenes, &c, there being a vast number of rich cloaths bought into their wardrobe within these two years, and large sums paid to the Taylor, Mercer and other Tradesmen, on account of the same, but then the Stock remains, and will serve for a considerable time with some little addition, and it is well known the wardrobe was never so rich before, as at this juncture, a great many of the cloaths having been bought ready-made at dery great bargains, and when they are no longer fit to appear upon the stage, the Lace will burn to a considerable part of their money again; And as it is impossible to be quite exact, I must submit to the reader whether #3 3s. a Night only for the use of their cloaths, Scenes and other things that appertain to the dress, is not sufficient, for according to the calculation of playing 170 nights in the season it will amount to #535 10s., only for the use, which in my opinion is enough, and if they can contradict it let them make it appear #3 3s.@Mr Fleetwood (who was the late manager) when he made an assignment of the Playhouse to Mr Lacy in trust for the Bankers (Gr n, and Am r, late of the Strand) and himself to care to keep a Reserve of #500 a year during the Time then to come on the P t [patent?], a part of which has been paid annually to a Gentleman appointed to receive the same by Mr Fleetwood. But when Mr G k came in as manager, it was agreed by the consent of that Gentleman, that it should be paid at the rate of #300 a year, and so to take a longer time for the payment of the whole. This annuity had it stood at the rate of #500 a year as was first design'd would have expir'd with the P t, which is several months before the Renter's time is out, but this affair ought to be look'd upon rather as a Debt than part of the nightly charge of the Playhouse. However, as it always stood in that Rank in their books, I shall make the same allowance here and leave the reader to judge of it as he thinks proper, which is per night according to the former calculation #1 15s. 3d.@The Lamp Lighter's bill for lighting the lamps will amount to about 7 shillings sixpence a night, but as there is an occasion sometimes for Tin Wares and reparations, I shall set it down at Per night 10s.@Coals made use of are generally about 40 Chaldrons for the season, which bought in the summer time, we must suppose not be to above 34s. a chaldron, amounting in the whole to #68, which is per night 8s.@Properties, or Incidents, are sometimes more, sometimes less, as I have before observed, and are according to the play. They are under the Denomination of Fruit, Wines, Sweetmeats, Sticks, Stage Money, &c, but to take one night with another throughout the season they don't amount to quite 5s.@Bill Stickers are those men that stick the Large Bills about the Town, being Six in number, and have 18 pence per night each. They are not enter'd on the pay List among other servants, on account of their sticking Bills sometimes when the House does not play, which makes a difference, and supposing them to be in full pay, which is not always the case, then it would amount to per night 9s.@Two men that deliver Handbills, at 1 shilling a night each per night 2s.@Four constant supernumerary scene-men to assist the scene-men belonging to the House, and a Candle-man that sees all tne candles put out after the play is over, at 1 shilling each, which is per night 5s.@There are sometimes extraordinary Supernumerary scene-men, made use of in plays, to help the traps, &c, such as Richard III, Macbeth, The Tempest, &c, which have a shilling each, but one night with another it will not amount to above 3s.@Kettle Drums and French Horns are not included among the Band of Music, and as there are but two French Horns, and one pair of Kettle Drums made use of, which are only in some particular things, at 5 shillings a night, I cannot think they will amount to throughout the season more than per night 7s. 6d.@Chorus singers, which are people that stand behind the scenes, whose additional voices are sometimes necessary in grand pieces of vocal music, and are made use of in the Tempest, Comus, Macbeth, &c., and seldom in number so many as 6, at 5 shillings each,--but if I make allowance for two each night throughout the season, I am very confident it is more than sufficient, which supposition is per night 10s.@The Prompter is allowed for Paper, Pens, Ink and Wafers per night 3d.@The Carpenters, being sometimes employed in doing work in the House, save 2s. 6d. a day each, and as this is also a fluctuating affair, I shall put them down throughout the season at per night 5s.@The Glover's bill amounts one night with another to about 6s.@The Stationer's Bill, perhaps about #15 in the season, every Boxkeeper, &c being oblig'd to find his own Paper, which is per night 1s. 9d.@The Feather-man, Shoe-maker, Sword-Cutler, Hatter, Taylor, Scene Painter, Lace-man, Mercer, &c, I have already made an allowance for,--the #3 3s. per night for the use of the Cloaths, Scenes, &c. ....@The Brick-layer and Iron-monger are casual tradesmen, and as accidents so frequently happen, I think it necessary to put them down at per night 7s. 6d.@The Turner's Bill perhaps may amount in the season to about #6 which is per night 8d.@The person that has the care of the Candles brings in a bill for small wax candles, &c, and one night with another about 1s. 6d.@The House-keeper sometimes brings in a bill for little things to the amount of about per night 1s.@The Prompter for writing parts, one night witn another 8d.@I have thus endeavored to give the most minute Part of the charges that belongs to the House, but as most of these affairs depends upon accident and for fear of any omission (At the beginning of the first season their salaries were a few weeks at #54 per night, but as this was but of a short duration it cannot make any great difference) and lest they say I fix them to certain sums which have alter'd to their disadvantage, I will as a guard against such a supposition allow them per night #3@#74 6s. 8d.@[Subtracting Mr Lacy's #2 15s. 6d.] then according to the nearest calculation I can make the whole nightly charge is #71 11s. 2d.@ The next thing to be consider'd (supposing this charge to be right) is their Profits, which will appear by multiplying the sum of #71 11s. 2d. by 346 (the number of nights they play'd in the two seasons) and the total sum will be #24,759 10s. 10d., which subtracted from #40,318 6s. 1d., the remainder will be #15,558 15s. 2d., the profits, according to the best calculations I can make arising from the two last seasons. But I think it incumbent on me to inform the reader that this money was not all at the Managers' disposal, because there was a mortgage upon the Playhouse, &c to one Mr Clutterbuck?, a tradesman in the Strand, who was Mortgagee in trust for Mr G k himself and others, and the Mortgagee was entitled to take up #1000 a year and interest at 5 per cent. This security was made at Mr G k's first commencing manager in order to purchase the Bankers' two shares in the old P t, &c. which was sold for #3,500, also to discharge an old mortgage made by Mr Fleetwood, and other debts due from the playhouse. Thus have I made appear to the Town the receipts and charges as near as possibly can, and hope not to the disadvantage of the Managers. But perhaps they will say that they have expended more money than I have already given an account of, which I must readily submit to, but then it has been upon different affairs than the nightly charge of the House; as for example the first season they, as will appear by their own Books, #15,179 12s. 3d.; the second season #13,663 3s. 3d., so at this rate the profits do not amount to above #10,475 10s. 8d., which is noways right, for as I have already observed, they bought large quantities of ready-made rich cloaths, merely because they were great bargains. These cloaths they now have by them, and doubtless are as good as money, and which I make an allowance for at #3 3s. a night. They also made alterations in the House, by enlarging the first Gallery, and adding more seats, which are placed so neighborly together, that they keep people pure warm in a cole [sic] winter's night, especially at the upper end. The transformation of that Part adjoining to the Box-Lobby into a standing place for the Quality, that they may pay before they go in, is another charming contrivance, and many other alterations much to advantage, but these conveniences being once finish't become Perpetual, and are no longer chargeable. Besides they lent out of the said sums money to several actors for some of which they have bonds that bear 5 per cent interest, and these are the things that were the occasion of the Extraordinary Advancement, which perhaps they under a pretence may call part of the Nightly charges, but as I have made the thing as clear as well can be, I shall submit to the reader's judgment. I thought it necessary to set down each night's farce with the play as near as I could throughout the two seasons, and I believe upon strict examination the reader will find that the whole number consists of about 25 good old Stagers, one of them having mounted upwards of that times. But however dis[agreea]ble these antient attendants may prove to an Audience, yet they are absolutely necessary on account of keeping up the [starf--l P[rice]s, which could not decently be done without them as Mr Rich has Pantomime entertainments. [starWhilst their rent, Taxes, &c are so very high, it is my firm opinion, they cannot afford to take under full prices, and therefore I would not have any one imagine to the Contrary. And the reason of publishing this account is no more than to do my self common justice and to shew how well they could afford to make me amends for my past Labours. Tho in my opinion Mr G-k is such a rarity, that he needs no embellishment, and I hope I shan't be thought too lavish in his Praise when I say that his great condesention in playing oftener since he has been a manager (almost in spite of his sickness) than he did when he was under management, is such an obligation conferr'd on the town, that it is questionable whether the salary he now receives as an Actor is equivalent. But lest it should not be generally known what it is (as such things do sometimes slip the ears of the People) I think it proper to inform the Reader, and having first ask'd Mr Garrick the manager's pardon, I shall begin with Mr Garrick the Actor, whose salary for the season is #525 certain, and as most players have a benefit once a year, so has he, but only this difference, that they pay for theirs (Mrs Cibber excepted) and he does not. Nor need he give himself any trouble to make an interest at the time; for it is only playing Richard, or Lear, and the job is done without putting his name up in large characters at the top of the Playbill, for every inquisitive person to gape at. What these Benefits have brought him in is easily seen by looking backwards. This added to the salary makes upwards of #700 a year, and so much for Mr G-k the actor. As to Mr Garrick the Manager, he only takes up #500 a year out of the profits under the denomination of Management, which does but just put him upon a footing with his brother manager, who takes up the same, and if I may presume to put the Manager and Actor together, it will appear that Mr Garrick's income from the Playhouse is upwards of #1200 a year exclusive of a Mortgage of #4000 upon the Playhouse, Patent, Cloaths, Scenes, &c., which brings him in #200 per year, at the rate of 5 per cent interest. These things put together and added to his half share of Profits, makes it a comfortable living enough, and I heartily wish every brave fellow that ventured his life and limbs for his Country's service could meet with the same success. I make no doubt but it will create some wonder that I have laid these things before the Town, without saying for why. But I must assure the reader that after weighing every circumstance well within my own breast, I think I have sufficient reason, and would relate each particular reason, but that I have given to understand Facts may be Libels--that all advantages will be taken--that I must have a care what I do, and that Power may get the better of Truth. I must confess I think it very hard that if a man is hurt he must not only suffer the injury, but be also hindered from telling his grievance. However, as I have often groan'd in private, I will run the risk of venturing one groan in public, but will be as concise as possible, for fear my antagonists may be too impatient to stay till my tale is told. Let it suffice them that I was Deputy Treasurer of D-y L-ne Playhouse upwards of four years, and resigened my office the beginning of this season. Several messages were sent to me to return again, and I had my place kept for me several weeks, which plainly shows I have been guilty of no misdemeanor, but have been rather look'd upon as a valuable sl-ve than other ways, and could I have been content with much more labor and little pay I don't doubt but I might have been suffer'd to trudge on and carry my Burthen to the end of my days. But having forgot my station, and that I had no right to make terms for myself, was so impudent as to imagine I had some Gratitude due me for past services, and that as I had weather'd a most terrible Storm, I had some right to share in the calm, but alas! I was mistaken. Property was not intended for me, I was only design'd to share in Adversity and help others to cut their passage to happiness. I believe it is pretty well known that near two years before Mr G-k came in as manager, the Playhouse was involved [in] many difficulties, much money being due to tradesmen, Actors, &c occasioned by his not playing there, which [would] not have been the case had Mr Lacy, who was then manager in trust for the Bankers and himself, agreed with him, and given what he demanded as an actor, which was as Mr Lacy order'd him #500 for the season, and as Mr G-k did not chuse to be under him he went to Ireland where he remain'd during the season. The Bankers who advanc'd #6,800 to purchase the Playhouse, the Renters, and Mr Lacy begun to see their folly, and were so unfortunate as to become Bankers' prey afterwards, though one of them (Mr Amber) has had the grant to be made a Pit office-keeper in the Playhouse, where he now remains at a salary of about #29 a year. I shall return to the difficulties. The People that had the demands to them (being upwards of #140) began to be very uneasy, and they very clamorous, that we perceiv'd what we were to depend upon. Distruction, seemingly as it was a dark cloud over our heads, we expected daily to burst upon us; and tho' Mr Lacy had given as many fair promises as a man could do, yet it availed nothing, for every word they spoke had something of danger in it (which oblig'd him to keep pretty much within doors). Here I interposed, and stood between him and his creditors, for upwards of a year and a half, ever breaking my rest to preserve his, and was continually forming excuses and pledging my word, to divert them from their design, and as it was unsafe for him to come to the playhouse for a long time together, for fear of arrests, I was oblig'd to undertake the management there (which they now take up #500 a year for) and go through a very hard Task to an account of the people's not having their pay. Added to this I had the Accounts of the Treasurer's Office to keep and as we were in debt every particular person's belonging to the playhouse, beside. I also took upon myself the Inspection of the Wardrobe and kept an account of that (which was almost one man's business alone to do). I drew all the articles between the manager and actor, and at other times were [sic] continually either writing, walking, though lame, or contriving for Mr Lacy's welfare. In the day I had no rest, in the night very little sleep, and my whole study was to extricate him from his troubles. I was bail for him to the Sheriff in two actions for #200, and brought at the suit of Mr Fl-dyer in Bazinghall St, and Mr Ho-se, Tinman in High Holborn, and had a great deal of trouble in getting one of these actions defended in order to gain time. I was arrested twice myself for him: one of these times dragg'd out of my lodgings at twelve o'clock at night. In short I went through every trouble that a sincere friend could do, while he was endeavouring to get the new Patent, which he and Mr Garrick now enjoy, and did imagine if ever those difficulties were got over (which I then very much question'd) that I should have met with some gratification, but instead of that as soon as Mr G-k came to be concern'd as a partner (who knew very well that I had gone through for the service of the Playhouse) I found another Person was to be put in Principal Treasurer over my head, with this Reason: "That it was their interest it should be so, because his Wife, Mrs Pr-h-d was to play for them." Not that I envy the gentleman that has it, for I think him worthy of much more, and hope my being under a necessity of mentioning it will be a sufficient plea for my excuse. This I very easily look'd over, and had not the least doubt but they would make me some amends another way, but adding something to my salary, which was at the rate of #44 a year, and this I was entitled to for doing the business of Deputy treasurer in the Office which was nothing in competition with the other affairs I had gone through. But I found I was mistaken here too for I had no addition, and discover'd when too late that I should have made use of the opportunity when I had it in my power,--but though I knew the time when everything must have been granted that I ask'd, yet I did not take the advantage, nor would by compulsion force the thing that I knew was due from the strongest ties of Friendship. How wretched must such a disappointment make me! What must that man deserve that can betray such confidence, and without blushing deny the breach he had made in Honour. If after this I can point out a way to do myself justice, have I not Right to make use of it? Must I lose my health, Time, Labor, for other's happiness, and not consider my miseries? It is against Nature and I hope the Reader will make my Case his own, and then judge accordingly. In my next I shall give the full history of the Stage ever since Mr Fl-w-d was manager, down to the end of the last season, wherein will be the Bankers' affair set forth at large. The manner of obtaining the new P-t, and Gratitude displayed in a particular manner. The intended partnership between Mr Rich and Mr Lacy, how Mr Garrick came to be admitted. His compact with Mrs Pritchard, and some other affairs necessary to be known both to the Public and the Theatres. @Then let the stricken deer go weep@The hart ungall'd go play...&c. &c.@Finis.@ [Powel's second pamphlet seems not to have been written, as this one seems never to have been printed. His total income for the two seasons #40,906 2s. 7d. corresponds favorably with Cross's total estimates for the same period of #40,995. His analysis of the cost of many items in his attempt to arrive at a reasonable statement of nightly charges is most valuable. If his figure of #71 11s. 2d. is correct, then the managers lost from #8 to #11 on each benefit night, which hardly seems probable.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Much Ado About Nothing

Cast
Role: Hero Actor: Mrs Elmy
Role: Balthasar Actor: _ Fryar-Bridges
Role: _ Fryar Actor: Bridges
Role: Borachio Actor: Blakes
Role: Margaret Actor: Mrs Havard.
Role: Dogberry Actor: Taswell
Role: Country Dance Actor: included at end of play.
Role: add Country Dance Actor: .
Role: add Masquerade Dance Actor: Mrs Addison.
Role: a Masquerade Dance Actor: Matthews
Role: to conclude with a Country Dance Actor: the Characters.
Role: Benedick Actor: Garrick for the first time
Role: Don Pedro Actor: Havard
Role: Leonato Actor: Berry
Role: Don John Actor: Winstone
Role: Claudio Actor: Lee
Role: Friar Actor: Bridges
Role: Sexton Actor: Ray
Role: Town Clerk Actor: James
Role: Verges Actor: Neale
Role: Conrade Actor: Bransby
Role: 1st Watchman Actor: Vaughan
Role: 2nd Watchman Actor: Marr
Role: Ursula Actor: Miss Cole
Role: Beatrice Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Musical parts Actor: Beard, Reinhold, Mrs Clive.

Afterpiece Title: The Intriguing Chambermaid

Cast
Role: also Goodall Actor: Winstone
Role: Mrs Highman Actor: Mrs Bennet.
Role: Drunken Colonel Actor: Woodward
Role: Lettice Actor: Mrs Clive.

Dance: Cook, Anne Auretti, Mathews, Mrs Addison

Event Comment: Benefit for Barry. Pit and Boxes laid together, and Stage, for better accommodation of the Ladies, will be form'd into Front and Side Boxes. Tickets to be had of Barry at the corner of Bow St., and of Hobson at the Stage Door. [This month was printd The Town, a Satire by Wm. Kenrick, with especial attack upon Garrick and Garrick's plays. In Miss in her Teens, he boasts the strange pretense, To satire Coxcombs, while he murders sense." Kenrick is one of the few who criticizes Garrick (p. 21) for playing a low character Abel Drugger, rather than a king. He yields indirect praise to Janeton Auretti by blaming the town for cheering her dance, while neglecting the players: @Yet if Janeton shakes her slender feet@How loud the thunder clatters through the Pit.@ Prologue intended to have been spoken on the Revival of The Distress'd Mother, for the Benefit of Mr Barry, but omitted through some misunderstanding. Written by Mr Rolt, printed in Gentleman's Magazine, March 1748, p. 134.] Receipts: #270 (Cross); house charges, #60 (Powel); cash, #80 3s. 6d.; tickets, #118 5s. (Clay MS)

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Distress'd Mother

Cast
Role: Orestes Actor: Barry for first time
Role: Pyrrhus Actor: Delane
Role: Hermione Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: with the original Epilogue Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Pylades Actor: Havard
Role: Phoenix Actor: Winstone
Role: Cleone Actor: Mrs Ridout
Role: Cephisa Actor: Miss Minors.

Afterpiece Title: Miss in Her Teens

Cast
Role: add Loveit Actor: Havard
Role: Puff Actor: Yates.
Role: Fribble Actor: Garrick
Role: Flash Actor: Macklin
Role: Sir Simon Loveit Actor: Arthur
Role: Loveit Actor: Havard
Role: Jasper Actor: Blakes
Role: Tag Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Aunt Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Miss Biddy Actor: Mrs Green.

Dance: Cooke, Anne Auretti

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Mourning Bride

Cast
Role: King Actor: Mills
Role: Osmyn Actor: Milward
Role: Gonzalez Actor: Quin
Role: Garcia Actor: Cibber
Role: Selim Actor: Cross
Role: Perez Actor: Winstone
Role: Alonzo Actor: Turbutt
Role: Heli Actor: Este
Role: Almeria Actor: Mrs Thurmond
Role: Zara Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Leonora Actor: Mrs Cross

Afterpiece Title: The Lottery

Cast
Role: Lovemore Actor: Salway
Role: Stocks Actor: Harper
Role: Chloe Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Jack Stocks Actor: Cibber

Dance: I: Ballet by Mlle Anne Roland. III: Grand Ballet by Denoyer, &c. V: Le Badinage de Provence by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c

Performance Comment: III: Grand Ballet by Denoyer, &c. V: Le Badinage de Provence by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Relapse

Cast
Role: Young Fashion Actor: Bardin
Role: Foppington Actor: Cibber
Role: Loveless Actor: Milward
Role: Worthy Actor: Mills
Role: Berinthia Actor: Mrs Thurmond
Role: Amanda Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Hoyden Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Sir Tunbelly Actor: Shepard
Role: Coupler Actor: Johnson
Role: Surgeon Actor: Griffin
Role: Shoemaker Actor: Miller
Role: Lory Actor: Oates

Afterpiece Title: Colombine Courtezan

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland. II: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. III: Le Chasseur Royal by Denoyer, Mlle Roland, &c

Performance Comment: II: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. III: Le Chasseur Royal by Denoyer, Mlle Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Twin Rivals

Cast
Role: Elder Woudbe Actor: Mills
Role: Young Woudbe Actor: W. Mills
Role: Trueman Actor: Cibber
Role: Teague Actor: Miller
Role: Richmore Actor: Berry
Role: Subtleman Actor: Bardin
Role: Alderman Actor: Johnson
Role: Balderdash Actor: Shepard
Role: Clearaccount Actor: Winstone
Role: Frisure Actor: Cross
Role: Comic Actor: Oates
Role: Captain Actor: Cole
Role: Fairbank Actor: Turbutt
Role: Squire Actor: Este
Role: Mrs Clearaccount Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Betty Actor: Mrs Villeneuve
Role: Aurelia Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Constance Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Midnight Actor: Harper

Afterpiece Title: The Virgin Unmask'd

Cast
Role: Goodwill Actor: Shepard
Role: Blister Actor: Harper
Role: Quaver Actor: Salway
Role: Wormwood Actor: Cross
Role: Coupee Actor: Este
Role: Thomas Actor: Raftor
Role: Lucy Actor: Mrs Clive

Dance: I: Venetian Gondolier and Courtezan by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c. II English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Le Badinage de Provence by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c. IV: Drunken Peasant by Le Brun. V: A new Comic Dance called The Rover: Rover-Essex; Flanderkin Woman-Mrs Walter; Dutchwoman-Miss Mann; Peasant Woman-Mrs Anderson; Dutchman-Duke; French Peasant-Davenport; Dutchmen and Wives-Pelling, Janno, Miss Brett, Mrs Davenport

Performance Comment: II English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Le Badinage de Provence by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c. IV: Drunken Peasant by Le Brun. V: A new Comic Dance called The Rover: Rover-Essex; Flanderkin Woman-Mrs Walter; Dutchwoman-Miss Mann; Peasant Woman-Mrs Anderson; Dutchman-Duke; French Peasant-Davenport; Dutchmen and Wives-Pelling, Janno, Miss Brett, Mrs Davenport .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Twin Rivals

Cast
Role: Elder Woudbe Actor: Mills
Role: Young Woudbe Actor: W. Mills
Role: Trueman Actor: Cibber
Role: Teague Actor: Miller
Role: Richmore Actor: Berry
Role: Subtleman Actor: Bardin
Role: Alderman Actor: Johnson
Role: Balderdash Actor: Shepard
Role: Clearaccount Actor: Winstone
Role: Frisure Actor: Cross
Role: Comic Actor: Oates
Role: Captain Actor: Cole
Role: Fairbank Actor: Turbutt
Role: Squire Actor: Este
Role: Mrs Clearaccount Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Betty Actor: Mrs Villeneuve
Role: Aurelia Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Constance Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Midnight Actor: Harper

Afterpiece Title: The Virgin Unmask'd

Cast
Role: Goodwill Actor: Shepard
Role: Blister Actor: Harper
Role: Quaver Actor: Salway
Role: Wormwood Actor: Cross
Role: Coupee Actor: Este
Role: Thomas Actor: Raftor
Role: Lucy Actor: Mrs Clive

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland, &c. II: Dutchman and Frow by Le Brun and Miss Brett. III: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. IV: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. V: The Rover, as17360103

Performance Comment: II: Dutchman and Frow by Le Brun and Miss Brett. III: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. IV: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. V: The Rover, as17360103.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Twin Rivals

Cast
Role: Elder Woudbe Actor: Mills
Role: Young Woudbe Actor: W. Mills
Role: Trueman Actor: Cibber
Role: Teague Actor: Miller
Role: Richmore Actor: Berry
Role: Subtleman Actor: Bardin
Role: Alderman Actor: Johnson
Role: Balderdash Actor: Shepard
Role: Clearaccount Actor: Winstone
Role: Frisure Actor: Cross
Role: Comic Actor: Oates
Role: Captain Actor: Cole
Role: Fairbank Actor: Turbutt
Role: Squire Actor: Este
Role: Mrs Clearaccount Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Betty Actor: Mrs Villeneuve
Role: Aurelia Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Constance Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Midnight Actor: Harper

Afterpiece Title: Colombine Courtezan

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland, &c. II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. IV: The Rover, as17360103

Performance Comment: II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. IV: The Rover, as17360103.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Twin Rivals

Cast
Role: Elder Woudbe Actor: Mills
Role: Young Woudbe Actor: W. Mills
Role: Trueman Actor: Cibber
Role: Teague Actor: Miller
Role: Richmore Actor: Berry
Role: Subtleman Actor: Bardin
Role: Alderman Actor: Johnson
Role: Balderdash Actor: Shepard
Role: Clearaccount Actor: Winstone
Role: Frisure Actor: Cross
Role: Comic Actor: Oates
Role: Captain Actor: Cole
Role: Fairbank Actor: Turbutt
Role: Squire Actor: Este
Role: Mrs Clearaccount Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Betty Actor: Mrs Villeneuve
Role: Aurelia Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Constance Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Midnight Actor: Harper

Afterpiece Title: The Devil to Pay

Cast
Role: Lady Loverule Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Jobson Actor: Harper
Role: Nell Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Sir John Actor: Salway

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland, &c. II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. IV: Dutchman and Frow by Le Brun and Miss Brett. V: The Rover, as17360103

Performance Comment: II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. IV: Dutchman and Frow by Le Brun and Miss Brett. V: The Rover, as17360103.

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Twin Rivals

Cast
Role: Elder Woudbe Actor: Mills
Role: Young Woudbe Actor: W. Mills
Role: Trueman Actor: Cibber
Role: Teague Actor: Miller
Role: Richmore Actor: Berry
Role: Subtleman Actor: Bardin
Role: Alderman Actor: Johnson
Role: Balderdash Actor: Shepard
Role: Clearaccount Actor: Winstone
Role: Frisure Actor: Cross
Role: Comic Actor: Oates
Role: Captain Actor: Cole
Role: Fairbank Actor: Turbutt
Role: Squire Actor: Este
Role: Mrs Clearaccount Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Betty Actor: Mrs Villeneuve
Role: Aurelia Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Constance Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Midnight Actor: Harper

Afterpiece Title: Harlequin Restor'd

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland. II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. IV: Russian Sailor by Denoyer, &c. V: French Peasants by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c

Performance Comment: II: English Maggot by Villeneuve and Mrs Walter. III: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. IV: Russian Sailor by Denoyer, &c. V: French Peasants by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Conscious Lovers

Cast
Role: Indiana Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Sir John Actor: Mills
Role: Bevil Jr Actor: Quin
Role: Myrtle Actor: W. Mills
Role: Cimberton Actor: Griffin
Role: Sealand Actor: Milward
Role: Humphrey Actor: Shepard
Role: Tom Actor: Cibber
Role: Daniel Actor: Leigh
Role: Lucinda Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Sealand Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Isabella Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Phillis Actor: Mrs Clive

Afterpiece Title: Harlequin Restor'd

Music: In II: Solo on Violin by Charke

Dance: II: New Serious Dance by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c. III: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. IV: French Peasants by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c

Performance Comment: III: Revellers by Essex, Mrs Walter, &c. IV: French Peasants by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Relapse

Cast
Role: Lory Actor: Mechlin
Role: Young Fashion Actor: Cross
Role: Foppington Actor: Cibber
Role: Loveless Actor: Milward
Role: Worthy Actor: Mills
Role: Berinthia Actor: Mrs Thurmond
Role: Amanda Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Hoyden Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Sir Tunbelly Actor: Shepard
Role: Coupler Actor: Johnson
Role: Surgeon Actor: Griffin
Role: Shoemaker Actor: Miller

Afterpiece Title: The Fall of Phaeton: With Harlequin Captive

Cast
Role: Phoebus Actor: Mrs Cantrell
Role: Phaeton Actor: Cross
Role: Clymene Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Ethiopian Actor: Essex
Role: Turkish Dancers Actor: Delamayne, Mrs Walter
Role: Turk Actor: Salway
Role: Harlequin Actor: Le Brun
Role: Morocco Servant Actor: Poitier
Role: Colombine Actor: Miss Mann
Role: Colombine's Maid Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Harlequin's Good Genius Actor: Miss Cole
Role: Adonis Actor: Denoyer
Role: Venus Actor: Mlle Anne Roland, but see17360304

Dance: I: By Mlle Anne Roland. II: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. III: Shepherd's Mount by Essex, Mrs Walter, Mrs Anderson, &c

Performance Comment: II: Tambourine by Mlle Roland. III: Shepherd's Mount by Essex, Mrs Walter, Mrs Anderson, &c .

Performances

Mainpiece Title: Love For Love

Cast
Role: Mrs Frail Actor: Mrs Butler
Role: Ben Actor: Miller
Role: Tattle Actor: Cibber
Role: Foresight Actor: Johnson
Role: Valentine Actor: Milward
Role: Scandal Actor: W. Mills
Role: Sir Sampson Actor: Shepard
Role: Jeremy Actor: Oates
Role: Trapland Actor: Griffin
Role: Angelica Actor: Mrs Thurmond
Role: Prue Actor: Mrs Clive
Role: Mrs Foresight Actor: Miss Hollyday
Role: Nurse Actor: Mrs Willis

Afterpiece Title: The Intriguing Chambermaid

Dance: I: Venetian Gondolier by Denoyer and Mlle Roland. II: Les Rigadoons a la Provencale originaie by Roland, Father to the two Mlles Roland. III: Les Caracteres de la Dance by Denoyer and Mlle Anne Roland. IV: By Denoyer's Apprentice. V: By particular Desire, Minuet by Denoyer and Mlle Anne Roland

Performance Comment: II: Les Rigadoons a la Provencale originaie by Roland, Father to the two Mlles Roland. III: Les Caracteres de la Dance by Denoyer and Mlle Anne Roland. IV: By Denoyer's Apprentice. V: By particular Desire, Minuet by Denoyer and Mlle Anne Roland .
Event Comment: Benefit Mlle Anne Roland. Tickets at Hippisley's, Playhouse Passage

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Committee

Cast
Role: Teague Actor: Cibber
Role: Careless Actor: Ryan
Role: Blunt Actor: Hale
Role: Day Actor: Hippisley
Role: Obadiah Actor: Arthur
Role: Abel Actor: Neale
Role: Story Actor: Rosco
Role: Bookseller Actor: James
Role: Mrs Day Actor: Mrs Mullart
Role: Arabella Actor: Mrs Bellamy
Role: Mrs Chat Actor: Mrs Martin
Role: Ruth Actor: Mrs Horton.

Afterpiece Title: The Devil to Pay

Cast
Role: Butler Actor: Arthur.
Role: Sir John Actor: Salway
Role: Lady Loverule Actor: Mrs Kilby
Role: Nell Actor: Mrs Vincent
Role: Jobson Actor: Mullart.

Dance: I: Peasants-French Boy and Girl; II: A new Grand Dance-Mlle Roland; III: Je ne scay quoy-Villeneuve, Richardson, Miss Oates; IV: Kilkenny-Glover, Mlle Roland; V: Scotch Dance-Glover, Mlle Roland

Performances

Mainpiece Title: The Conscious Lovers

Cast
Role: Indiana Actor: Mrs Cibber
Role: Sir John Actor: Mills
Role: Bevil Jr Actor: Quin
Role: Myrtle Actor: W. Mills
Role: Cimberton Actor: Griffin
Role: Sealand Actor: Milward
Role: Humphrey Actor: Shepard
Role: Tom Actor: Cibber
Role: Daniel Actor: Leigh
Role: Lucinda Actor: Miss Holliday
Role: Mrs Sealand Actor: Mrs Cross
Role: Isabella Actor: Mrs Pritchard
Role: Phillis Actor: Mrs Clive

Afterpiece Title: Harlequin Restor'd

Music: In II: Solo on Violin by Charke

Dance: III: Le Badinage by Poitier, Mlle Roland, &c. IV: Le Ballet d'Amour (new) by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c

Performance Comment: IV: Le Ballet d'Amour (new) by Denoyer, Mlle Anne Roland, &c .